Politics

Retiring Republicans May Not Show Up to Vote, Threatening Border Wall Vote

There might be one bloc conspicuously absent from Washington, D.C., this week amid the possibility of a shutdown: retired House Republicans. Government funding expires at midnight Friday, and despite President Donald Trump’s repeated calls to pass $5 billion for border wall funding, Republicans in either chamber might not be able to pass a spending bill that includes a provision funding the wall. “Many lawmakers, relegated to cubicles as incoming members take their offices, have been skipping votes in the weeks since House Republicans were swept from power in the midterm elections, and Republican leaders are unsure whether they will ever return,” The New York Times reported Sunday. “In recent weeks, anywhere from a handful to more than two dozen Republicans have failed to cast votes on individual bills, leaving leaders uncertain of their numbers,” the Times added. The Senate returned Monday and the House resumes business Wednesday night. Trump has…

Left Embraces Trump’s Ex-Lawyer Despite History of Deception

The left has a new hero: former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen. In recent days, Democrat politicians and the media have glommed onto Cohen, who has turned quickly into a harsh critic of President Donald Trump. Cohen recently pleaded guilty to committing campaign finance violations while working for Trump. After a federal judge sentenced him to three years in prison Wednesday, Cohen was interviewed by ABC’s George Stephanopoulos, who was a press secretary and political adviser to President Bill Clinton. Cohen blasted Trump and accused the president of intentional wrongdoing. “I knew what I was doing was wrong,” Cohen said in the interview. “I stood up before the world and I accepted the responsibility for my actions.” Cohen said that Trump “of course” knew it was wrong to authorize payments to two women who said they had sexual relationships with him—porn star Stormy Daniels and former Playboy model Karen McDougal. “Instead…

Why PolitiFact’s Winner of the ‘Lie of the Year’ Award Is Misleading

This week, the allegedly unbiased fact-checkers at PolitiFact awarded their “Lie of the Year” award to the “online smear machine” that attempted “to take down” the survivors of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. “The attacks against Parkland’s students stand out because of their sheer vitriol,” the piece explains. “Together, the lies against the Parkland students in the wake of unspeakable tragedy were the most significant falsehoods of 2018.” It should go without saying that those who spread the conspiracy theory that the activists in the wake of the horrific school shooting were “crisis actors”—kids only pretending to be victims—are exceptionally terrible people. It’s debatable, though, whether this conspiracy theory, which had no effect on policy or the students’ ability to march or speak out, should be considered the most significant political lie in 2018. I’m relatively positive that the vast majority of Americans have…

The Establishment’s Full Fury Against Trump Is Now Unleashed

Hell may have no fury like a woman scorned, but scorning the Washington establishment produces even greater anger. The establishment’s full fury has been unleashed against Donald Trump and is not about to subside until its goal is reached: the removal of the president from office, either through impeachment or defeat in the 2020 election. If there were more than the kitchen sink to throw at Trump, the establishment would be throwing it. The latest is the hyping of private money paid to two women by Trump’s disgraced lawyer, Michael Cohen. The women claim it was money to keep them quiet over alleged affairs with him. Behavior that was tolerated, or overlooked, by previous presidents is now grounds for indictment and impeachment, says the establishment. Members of Congress who claim Trump violated campaign finance laws by making personal payments to these women are mostly silent about a $17 million congressional…

Major Media Outlets Do 180-Turnaround on George H.W. Bush After His Passing

Before George H.W. Bush fades from memory into the darkness of history books, one more point needs to be made. It is about the contrast between how most of the major media treated him when he was president and how they mostly (but not completely) did a 180 during their coverage and commentary of his funeral. Maybe reporters and anchors considered their largely favorable and complimentary coverage of the man in death as penance for their earlier sins during his life, but they still should be held accountable for what they said about him when it mattered. CBS News anchor Dan Rather interviewed Bush, then-vice president, in 1988, before the Iowa caucuses. This was at the height of the Iran-Contra affair during which the White House sought to circumvent a law banning funds to aid the Nicaraguan contras who were fighting communist forces. Bush and Rather shouted at each other…

Right Side of History: Meet the Man Who Made the Supreme Court

“The Right Side of History” is a podcast dedicated to exploring current events through a historical lens and busting left-wing myths about figures and events of America’s past. On this week’s episode, hosts Jarrett Stepman and Fred Lucas discuss the legacy of Chief Justice John Marshall and how it relates to today. Chief Justice John Roberts has criticized President Donald Trump for lambasting an “Obama judge” on the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for ruling unfavorably against him. This brings up the question: Are judges inherently partisan and what does this mean for the concept of an “independent judiciary”? To discuss this and more, Lucas and Stepman chatted with Richard Brookhiser, an editor at National Review, whose latest book “John Marshall: The Man Who Made the Supreme Court,” delves into the life of America’s greatest legal minds.

On the Street: Americans Remember Bush

Following the death of President George H.W. Bush, we took our cameras to the streets of Capitol Hill to talk to people about the legacy our 41st president leaves behind. Bush died at his home in Houston on Friday at the age of 94. We spoke to people all of ages, including veterans and former members of Bush’s administration, about what they will remember most about him and what he will be remembered for. One woman told The Daily Signal: “First all of all, he loved God, he loved his family, he loved this nation. Having served this nation with a man of decency and dignity … and a dad, dignity, decency, and a dad.” “I think those combinations were wonderful and I have so much respect for him. I’m so glad to be here,” she added.

10 Fascinating Facts About George H.W. Bush

George H.W. Bush, the nation’s 41st president, leaves a remarkable legacy and lifetime of achievements. Bush, who died Friday evening at his Houston home at age 94, held a variety of titles throughout his life, including decorated war hero, successful businessman, congressman, ambassador, CIA director, vice president, and president. But many knew him as much more. ‘Preserver of the Universe’ Throughout his long career, George Herbert Walker Bush had a variety of nicknames. While a student at Yale, he was known as “Poppy” and “Have-Half.” “Poppy” was a nickname bestowed by his mother because his namesake and maternal grandfather was already known as “Pops.”  “Have-Half” was the result of his frequent kindness in giving away half his sandwich to others. Christopher Buckley, Bush’s speechwriter when he was vice president, explains the meaning behind Bush’s adopted nickname “The Vishnu.” During a state trip  to India, Bush received a statue of the…

7 of the Most Epic Midterm Elections in American History

President Donald Trump isn’t on the ballot but will face the biggest electoral test of his presidency so far during Tuesday’s midterm election—one that may well end in repudiation or vindication. History is not on any president’s side in a midterm election. Since 1862, the president’s party on average loses 32 House seats and more than two Senate seats in a midterm. And in the 47 midterms since 1826, the president’s party lost seats in 41 of them. Several scenarios could play out. The opposition party could gain what President Barack Obama called a “shellacking” when Republicans won 63 House seats in 2010. It could be a rare victory for the president’s party—which occurred only three times in the past 100 years: 1934, 1998, and 2002. Another likelihood is somewhere in between, such as in 1962 and 1990, when the president’s party suffered only modest losses. Here’s a look at…

Here Are the 3 Times in Past Century That President’s Party Gained Seats in Midterms

History is not on any president’s side in a midterm election. But there are three occasions since 1934 when a president’s political party actually gained seats in Congress. Since 1862, the president’s party on average loses 32 House seats and more than two Senate seats in a midterm election. And in the 47 midterms since 1826, the president’s party lost seats in 41 of them, according to The Wall Street Journal. Here’s a look at the three notable exceptions. 1. FDR’s Democratic Party in 1934 President Herbert Hoover, a Republican, presided over the Great Depression spurred by the 1929 stock market crash. In 1932, Democrat Franklin D. Roosevelt defeated Hoover in a landslide and went on to push his New Deal legislation. Recovery wasn’t happening as quickly as promised. But, coming back from an economic crisis, the country gave FDR another nine House Democrats and another 10 Senate Democrats in…

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